A Truly New Idea

A new web client has found what is to me a new way of using “radio” in his domain name–just when we thought all the variants had been taken. He simply combined the word “radio” with his local area code–as in www.radio999.com. If you’re looking for a new brand, you might keep that in mind.

Unfortunately, the web client referred to above didn’t think he’d be changing his web address at all. But at the end of last week, his midday personality-webmaster marched into his office, threw her keys on his desk, and left the building without another word.

But wait! There’s more: When she left, she took with her all of the passcodes and account numbers related to their website; what’s more, it turns out that she owns the domain name the station has been using for years. When the manager finally caught up with her, she wanted $1500 in cash for the domain name; she settled for that sum in trade to allow the station to continue using its e-mail addresses for another month.

A few years ago, none of us knew enough about this strange new world of the World Wide Web to protect ourselves from this sort of nonsense. Now we do know, and you need to make sure that you have control over your Internet address (a.k.a. your brand), your website and your e-mails.

Of course, all this presumes that your webmaster will cooperate. While he or she will be upset about the lack of “keeper of the keys” status, there is absolutely no good reason for them to withhold information–and, if necessary, sign over the domain name to you. If he or she balks at this, that tells you a lot about his/her character; it also tells you that you had better begin the process of securing a new domain name pronto!

A Truly New Idea
A new web client has found what is to me a new way of using “radio” in his domain name–just when we thought all the variants had been taken. He simply combined the word “radio” with his local area code–as in www.radio999.com. If you’re looking for a new brand, you might keep that in mind.
Horror Story
Unfortunately, the web client referred to above didn’t think he’d be changing his web address at all. But at the end of last week, his midday personality/webmaster marched into his office, threw her keys on his desk, and left the building without another word.
But wait! There’s more: When she left, she took with her all of the passcodes and account numbers related to their website; what’s more, it turns out that she owns the domain name the station has been using for years. When the manager finally caught up with her, she wanted $1500 in cash for the domain name; she settled for that sum in trade to allow the station to continue using its e-mail addresses for another month.
A few years ago, none of us knew enough about this strange new world of the World Wide Web to protect ourselves from this sort of nonsense. Now we do know, and you need to make sure that you have control over your Internet address (a.k.a. your brand), your website and your e-mails.
Of course, all this presumes that your webmaster will cooperate. While he or she will be upset about the lack of “keeper of the keys” status, there is absolutely no good reason for them to withhold information–and, if necessary, sign over the domain name to you. If he or she balks at this, that tells you a lot about his/her character; it also tells you that you had better begin the process of securing a new domain name pronto!

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